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FAQ

When should I start brushing my baby’s teeth?

As soon as the teeth begin to erupt, brushing or wiping should become part of the daily routine. An infant’s mouth should be wiped clean before the eruption of teeth. Bath time is a great time to clean the mouth’s soft tissue with a soft washcloth and water only. Toothpaste without fluoride is recommended for children under age 3.

When should I make my child’s first dental visit?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends a child have their first oral/dental examination between 12-18 months.

Why has my child’s front tooth turned dark?

More than likely, the tooth has been traumatized at some point. This is common with the toddler who is learning to pull up or walk. They have a tendency to bump the mouth on the floor, tub or coffee table. The incident may be enough to make the child cry with minimal or no bleeding present. The tooth may begin to turn a gray color within days, weeks or months.

My child hasn’t lost any baby teeth but the permanent teeth are coming in. What should I do?

Call for an examination. The most common incident of this is with the loss of the first baby teeth, usually the lower front teeth. The parent may not be aware that the baby teeth have begun to loosen until the permanent tooth is peeking through behind the baby teeth. After evaluation, the normal recommendation is to extract (remove) the baby teeth allowing the permanent teeth to move into their proper position.

How often should my child have x-rays?

X-rays are needed to diagnose what cannot be seen with a visual exam. The primary reason for using x-rays is to determine if there is decay between teeth, but x-rays also detect missing or extra teeth and/or other anomalies with the teeth or jaws. In children who have very little or no space between the teeth or who have dental development that should be kept under observation, it may be recommended to have x-rays taken every six months as they are more prone to develop the “unseen” decay.